Special Asset Issues

Bankruptcy and Special Assets

Bankruptcy and Special AssetsIf you have decided to file for bankruptcy as a way to get a fresh financial start, you may have concerns about how the bankruptcy filing will affect certain articles of property. What about any money you have received or are eligible for through an inheritance? What about your retirement plan assets? Will you have to reclaim property given to friends or family, or that you’ve recently sold or given away?

Inheritance and Bankruptcy

Whether or not the proceeds of an inheritance will be accessible to the bankruptcy trustee in a Chapter 7 proceeding depend on two issues:

  • Whether your state allows you to claim an exemption on an inheritance—the law varies from state to state
  • When you received the inheritance—if you have already received the inheritance when you file, or if you receive the inheritance within 180 days of filing, it must be included in a Chapter 7 proceeding

Retirement Plan Assets and Bankruptcy

As a general rule, money put into a retirement plan is exempt from access to pay creditors in a bankruptcy proceeding. This includes profit-sharing plans, defined benefit plans, 401(k)s, IRAs and money purchase plans. The only retirement assets that may be taken by the bankruptcy court are Roth and traditional IRA plan assets in excess of $1,245,475.

Gifts to Friends or Family or Items Recently Sold

A significant gift to a friend or family member within two years (under federal rules) of a bankruptcy filing can qualify as a fraudulent transfer. Some states will look back as far as seven years. As a general rule, if the bankruptcy court finds a transfer to be fraudulent, it will require that the property or its value be returned to the bankruptcy estate. It may also prohibit you from completing the bankruptcy.

Items sold at fair market value typically don’t qualify as a fraudulent transfer, but a sale for less than market value may have the same consequences as a gift.

Contact John Hargrave and Associates

We have provided comprehensive counsel to individuals in and around Barrington, New Jersey, since 1977. To schedule a free initial consultation, contact our office by e-mail or call us at 856-547-6500.

The Two Most Common Personal Bankruptcy Options

Your Personal Bankruptcy Options

If you are considering filing for personal bankruptcy protection, you can easily be confused about the different options available to you. Here are the basic options for obtaining personal bankruptcy protection.

Chapter 7 Case

In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceeding, you are allowed to replace with most debts certain debts in exchange for the sale of some of your assets. There are some limitations on the debts you may discharge. Customarily, you cannot discharge the debt on secured assets—homes or cars—and still keep the property. Additionally, child support and alimony arrearages cannot be wiped out in bankruptcy, and student loan and tax debts are very difficult to discharge.

With respect to things you are financing like your car or home if you want to keep it you have to continue to make the payments. If the thing you are financing is work less than what you owe, you have the option to give it back to the lender and owe them nothing or keep it but continue with the payments.

Under the revisions to the federal bankruptcy laws in 2005, you must now qualify for Chapter 7 by submitting to a means test, where the bankruptcy court determines if you make too much money to be in Chapter 7, in which case your options are to file Chapter 13 or no bankruptcy.

Chapter 13 Reorganization

In a Chapter 13 petition, you work out new payment arrangements with your creditors, agreeing to settle your debts over a three-to-five year period. Often, you will be able to get late fees and penalties waived. As long as you honor your new commitments, your creditors cannot make any additional efforts to collect on a debt.

The Automatic Stay

Whether you file for protection under Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, you are immediately entitled to the protection of the automatic stay, which prevents your creditors from calling, writing or taking any legal action outside of the bankruptcy proceeding to collect a debt from you.

Contact John Hargrave and Associates

We have provided comprehensive counsel to individuals in and around Barrington, New Jersey, since 1977. To schedule a free initial consultation, contact our office by e-mail or call us at 856-547-6500.